Tag Archives: kendo

2015 Shinsa Seminar

On July 11th, 2015 there was seminar on taking the promotion examination for 3rd through 5th Dan.

A total of 34 individuals attended and the feedback was extremely positive.  Because of this another seminar will be planned that will include the material from the March seminar on being an examiner.  The next evolution will be multiple days with a lot more emphasis on drills and preparation.  Participants received blank Root Cause Analyse forms and Pyramid of Objective forms to help work on their problem areas and goal setting.

 

7-11-15 shinsa seminar

 

 

Instructors: Robert Stroud, Kyoshi Nanadan, Tatsuhiko Konno, Kyoshi Nanadan and Jeff Marsten, Kyoshi Nanadan.
Location: Sno-King Kendo Club (Bitter Lake Community Center Annex at Broadview Thompson Elementary School)
13052 Greenwood Ave N Seattle, WA 98133
Date/Time: TBD
Cost: TBD

Email: jmarsten@comcast.net for any questions regarding the seminar.
DOWNLOAD THE APPLICATION FORM HERE
Payment instructions are on the form.

There is practice available on Friday night at Bellevue Kendo Club: 14224 Bell-Red Road, Bellevue WA

For location maps see the Sno-King and Bellevue Kendo Club sites

The Path to Excellence

In kendo there is an old maxim that states 1,000 practices to temper and 10,000 practices to polish. Research has shown that to become an expert requires 10,000 hours of practice. So let’s look at the numbers to get there. In general we have about 45 practices per year. So if by some miracle you attend all these practices we have a baseline to go by.

First by number of practices: Continue reading The Path to Excellence

A State of Equilibrium

Brass_scales_with_cupped_trays
Has your kendo club reached a “State of Equilibrium?”

When there is little chance for interaction with other clubs it is quite common to reach this state. A “State if Equilibrium” is when every practice has basically the same level of intensity. We all experience an extra surge of vigor and intensity when we keiko with someone new. All the old challenges of vying to test yourself come out of the closet and we practice hard and seriously. When the club and yourself see the same people week after week it is very easy to reach a “State of Equilibrium.” This “state” is a progress killer. After each exchange a brief moment of rest is taken, a relax period, then each of the aite assumes kamae and another exchange ensues. If a dojo or club is to move to the next level and continue to improve then the state of equilibrium cannot continue. Continue reading A State of Equilibrium